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RE: Occupy

Businesses are facing many real and unique challenges as the world responds to COVID-19.

With thoughts turning to re-occupying premises, people are faced with dealing with the practicalities of how to implement social distancing measures and ensure the safety of employees. Critical to this is how you manage your premises and questions are being asked by businesses, particularly in multi-let office buildings, about who is responsible for ensuring common areas are safe (such as the reception areas, toilets and lifts) and who must pay for measures which must be implemented to make them safe.

We have launched RE: Occupy to help.

RE: Occupy is designed to provide you with a combination of thought leadership and peer insights with low cost, fixed fee, high-quality services to support your re-occupation.

What does RE: Occupy offer?

  • Thought leadership from our market leading employment and real estate practices, focusing on your key assets – your people and your buildings.
  • Peer to peer insights through a series of round table discussions with similar corporate occupiers and leading property agents.
  • Transparency and cost certainty to meet your property needs during re-occupation. We are offering a low cost, fixed fee menu of services to assist with issues such as documenting alterations to deal with social distancing guidelines or extending lease terms. Fees start at £240 +VAT for an alterations review and report.

 

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