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Technology Disputes

Lewis Silkin works with some of the most dynamic and innovative technology companies in the world.

We have a specialist technology sector group and a wealth of experience in technology disputes (and pre-empting them where possible). We provide down-to-earth, commercial and cost-effective advice to resolve disputes by litigation, arbitration, negotiation or other forms of alternative dispute resolution.

Our clients range from entrepreneurs, start-up companies and their financiers and investors, to large multi-nationals and internationally-known technology companies. The disputes we handle cover all areas of expertise in our technology sector group.

 

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My supplier claims we made a deal over the phone but I disagree. Who’s right? Fraser McKeating writes for The Times

09 August 2021

One of my suppliers says we reached a deal but I don’t think we did. It was all done over the phone so I don’t have paper records. What can I do?

Misrepresentation: the pitfalls of pre-contract statements

22 July 2021

Prior to the conclusion of a contract parties will often make statements to each other - during negotiations, in tender documents and in a variety of other ways. Most pre-contract statements are carefully considered. But sometimes statements are made which are false or misleading. When false statements induce an innocent party to enter into a contract the consequences can be serious.

A guide to the litigation process in England and Wales

20 July 2021

If you are involved in a dispute you need to know: what options there are for resolving the dispute; what litigation involves; the steps from the start of proceedings to trial; what parties to proceedings have to do; the fundamentals of court procedure; how to use legal advisers efficiently and cost effectively; and what happens after judgment.

A guide to the litigation process in England and Wales including guidance on the disclosure pilot scheme

20 July 2021

If you are involved in a dispute in England and Wales you need to know: what options there are for resolving the dispute, what litigation involves, the steps from the start of proceedings to trial, what parties to proceedings have to do, the fundamentals of court procedure, how to use legal advisers efficiently and cost effectively, and what happens after judgment.

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Counsel to step up anti-piracy efforts after copyright win: Neil Parkes comments for Managing IP

12 March 2021

In-house lawyers in the music industry say two court rulings that ordered internet service providers to block access to stream-ripping websites will encourage them to target other services that have slipped through the net, and will add weight to their demands for legislative changes.

Business

New rules on witness statements in force from 6 April 2021

09 March 2021

The Civil Procedure Rule Committee has approved new rules on preparing trial witness statements of fact in the Business and Property Courts of England and Wales (i.e. the Chancery Division, the Commercial Court, Circuit Commercial Court, Financial List). The new rules apply to trial witness statements signed on or after 6 April 2021 (with certain exceptions) and will have a significant impact. Parties and their advisers need to become familiar with the changes now for any trial statements that may already be in progress.

contracts

Dispute Resolution Update - October 2020

16 October 2020

Welcome to our October 2020 Dispute Resolution Update which collates some of our recent insights. We will be hosting our next dispute resolution webinar on the 5th November 'Trading through the pandemic: insolvency issues, risk and contractual performance.' You can find registration instructions here. Thank you for reading the October Dispute Resolution Update.

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Covert recordings – does use in court justify the risk?

13 October 2020

With the ubiquity of smartphones, most people have the ability secretly to record a conversation or meeting, but in the context of proceedings before the court in England, key questions are: will the court allow covert recordings to be used as evidence? And will the maker of the recording risk liability to claims from the people recorded?

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