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Registration of Intellectual Property

For many types of IP, registration with the relevant national or international governmental official office provides the owner with the strongest form of IP protection as it confers a state granted limited monopoly. .

We assist our clients in obtaining registrations for their IP both in the UK and EU and also internationally through our global network of tested and trusted contacts. We have an enviable track record of navigating trade marks that are difficult to register through both registry and competitor complaints.  The registration process is assisted by having applications managed through our specialist IP Portfolio Management software.

Our services include:

  • trade marks
  • designs
  • patents
  • domain names

 

 

Related items

London

Steven Jennings comments for The Telegraph: Fraudsters try to cash in on the good name of British legal companies

15 July 2019

Steven Jennings has commented in an article for The Telegraph that discusses how leading British law firms are being targeted by cyber criminals who set up fake email accounts and pose as top lawyers to try to con people and companies out of millions.

Can we remove “limited” from the end of our company name?

30 July 2018

In certain circumstances a private limited company can apply to Companies House to be registered with a name that does not have “limited” (or the Welsh equivalent) at the end. This article summarises the circumstances of this exemption.

Brands and IP newsnotes - issue 6

13 October 2017

Welcome to the 6th edition of our Brands & IP newsnotes put together to bring you the latest, and most interesting legal developments affecting intellectual property law. In this issue we cover; battlegrounds on Amazon listings, whether prestigious brands can prevent their resellers from selling online, the EU's position paper on IP rights, an quick guide on rights for designs, and trade mark infringements.

Brands and IP newsnotes - issue 5

27 June 2017

Welcome to the 5th edition of our Brands & IP newsnotes put together to bring you the latest, and most interesting legal developments affecting intellectual property law. In this issue we cover; the potential pitfalls of social media, design by artificial intelligence, interesting trade mark applications and cases, an update on the UPC, and the importance of protecting trade secrets.

Office

Clash of the Titans: Google v Uber (Brands & IP Newsnotes - issue 5)

23 June 2017

In February, Waymo, part of Google’s parent company, sued Uber for theft of confidential information. Allegedly, a former employee of Waymo, who had been a key part of Google’s driverless car initiative, took 14,000 files and then shortly jumped ship to start up his own autonomous vehicle company. A short time later, Uber acquired the start-up for $680 million.

office floor

Champagne supernova: Cristal brand owner sues cava producer (Brands & IP Newsnotes - issue 5)

23 June 2017

Do you know your Champagne from your Cava? Quite possibly, but a High Court judge held in late 2015 that a Spanish cava producer trading under the brand name, “Cristalino” had used a confusingly similar sign to that of the famous tipple preferred by rappers and the like, “Cristal”.

To UPC or not UPC – implementation of Unified Patent Court delayed (Brands & IP Newsnotes - issue 5)

23 June 2017

The Unified Patent Court (UPC) is intended to provide a regional forum resolve patent disputes. At the moment, parties have to litigate patent disputes on a country by country basis across Europe, which is time-consuming, expensive and can lead to differing decisions in some countries. UPC decisions will have effect in all 25 states participating in the UPC, providing a single forum to resolve these disputes.

All hands on deck as creative industries and search engines tackle online piracy (Brands & IP Newsnotes - issue 5)

23 June 2017

The UK Government, through the UKIPO, Ofcom and DMCS, has helped broker an agreement between Google, Bing, the BPI and Motion Picture Association over a new voluntary code of practice.

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