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Dispute Resolution

When disputes arise, they can often have far-reaching implications for the rest of a business.

Contentious issues need to be dealt with swiftly and appropriately to prevent them escalating, keeping disruption and financial impact to a minimum. Mitigating risk is just as important as robustly fighting a claim in court. There are numerous alternatives to litigation, so pursuing the right strategy is important to ensure disputes are resolved in the most effective way.

Lewis Silkin Dispute Resolution

We treat problems as if they are our own, working closely and collaboratively with our clients to provide practical solutions that fit with their commercial objectives. While we have a substantial group of litigators, we are also experts in alternative dispute resolution, mediation and arbitration. In addition, we also provide risk mitigation and investigation services to help clients identify where issues might arise, and where they have in the past, to work out the causes and implement solutions.

Whether it’s handling high-profile, complex cases in the High Court and beyond, or working behind the scenes with a minimum of fuss, clients rely on our first-class insight to help them stay one step ahead.

 

 

 

 

You can view our latest two Dispute Resolution blog posts below and our full blog here.

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We’ve supported a supplier through Covid but they are now really letting us down. We have a dispute resolution clause in our contract but we’ve had some heated calls and the relationship is broken. Can I skip it and go straight to court?

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Webinar: Litigating after lockdown: hot topics in dispute resolution beyond the pandemic

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In this live webinar we reflect on the fact that, as the pandemic abates, our “new normal” is likely to involve commercial risk and an increase in disputes. In light of these risks, we will consider some practical trends that are likely to emerge and how those trends will affect the resolution of disputes.

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What can we do about an EU customer charging us for Brexit delays? Rebecca Harries writes for The Times

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We make goods in the UK and are struggling with delivering our products to Europe on time because of additional costs and delays caused by Brexit. One of our overseas customers is threatening to impose financial penalties on us for the delay. What should we do?

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In recent years, HM Revenue & Customs (“HMRC”) have ramped up their investigations into the tax affairs of the football industry with a particular focus on the tax treatment of agents' fees. According to research by the accountancy firm UHY Hacker Young, the number of footballers investigated by HMRC rose dramatically in the tax year 2019-20, going up from 87 to 246 individuals, and the number of investigations into the tax affairs of football agents also increased substantially, more than doubling from 23 in 2018-19 to 55 in 2019-20.

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Did contractual dispute resolution clauses have immunity from the effects of Covid-19 and the lockdown restrictions?

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As businesses plan to recommence operations, they must consider the legal implications of any action taken or contemplated to preserve contracts and business relationships and be alive to the potential consequences of action threatened or taken by other contracting parties. The actual or perceived amenable approach taken by some during the pressure of lockdown may quickly evaporate as the country returns to some sort of normality. This combined with economic uncertainty is likely to result in an increase in disputes.

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